Russia stole from a Ukrainian crypt the bones of Catherine the Great’s lover, the conqueror who annexed Crimea and inspired Putin

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Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks during the annual meeting with participants of the Valdai International Discussion Club, on October 27, 2022 in Moscow, Russia.
Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks all through the annual meeting with contributors of the Valdai International Discussion Club, on October 27, 2022 in Moscow, Russia.

  • The bones of Potemkin have been eradicated from Kherson and taken deeper into Russian-occupied territory.
  • Potemkin was Catherine the Great’s lover and carried out a key operate in the annexation of Crimea in 1783.
  • Putin’s imperialistic ambitions in Ukraine are tied to this historic previous. 

Moscow’s proxy rulers in the occupied port metropolis of Kherson acknowledged this week that they’ve taken the bones of Prince Grigory Aleksandrovich Potemkin, the lover of Catherine the Great who carried out a key operate in the annexation of Crimea in 1783 and the establishment of “New Russia” in what’s now southern Ukraine. Russian President Vladimir Putin’s imperialistic ambitions in Ukraine are tied to this historic previous, as he has repeatedly referred to Ukrainians and Russians as “one people.” 

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Potemkin’s stays have been eradicated from St. Catherine’s Cathedral and taken deeper into Russian-occupied territory as Ukrainian forces switch to retake Kherson. A statue of Potemkin, who based mostly Kherson and Odesa, was moreover eradicated.

A portrait of Potemkin.
A portrait of Prince Grigory Aleksandrovich Potemkin.

“We transported to the left bank the remains of the holy prince that were in St. Catherine’s Cathedral,” Vladimir Saldo, the Russia-appointed head of the Kherson space, acknowledged in an interview on Russian TV, per the New York Times. “We transported Potemkin himself,” he added. 

Sebag Montefiore, a historian and author of “Catherine the Great and Potemkin,” acknowledged in tweets that Potemkin would’ve “loathed” Putin’s “primitive” and “cruel nationalism.” He described Potemkin as an “imperialist but also a child of enlightenment” who settled cities with of us from a choice of backgrounds and nationalities. 

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Montefiore acknowledged he predicts that the “stolen body” of the navy chief is perhaps utilized by Putin for a “plangent imperial TV extravaganza,” together with that “Putin will bury Potemkin in a flashy new Moscow tomb & promote his war.”

Putin’s wish to subjugate Ukraine is intrinsically linked to Russia’s imperial earlier. In a recent op-ed for Foreign Affairs, excessive Russia specialists Fiona Hill and Angela Stent wrote that Putin “ordered his ‘special military operation’ because he believes that it is Russia’s divine right to rule Ukraine, to wipe out the country’s national identity, and to integrate its people into a Greater Russia.”

“In his version of history, Ukraine has never been sovereign, except for a few historical interludes when it tried—and failed—to become an independent state,” they added.”

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Putin’s war, however, has so far failed to achieve its objectives. An attempt to quickly seize the Ukrainian capital fell apart, forcing Russia to concentrate its efforts on the east, where grinding artillery battles took their toll on both sides. Over the past two months, though, Ukrainian forces have managed to launch a counteroffensive that has liberated significant amounts of territory in the east and threatened Russian territorial holdings in the south.

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