The freefall in tech and other growth stocks shows Wall Street grappling with ‘the revenge of the old financial system’, Goldman Sachs commodities chief says

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  • The plunge in tech and growth stocks is the “revenge of the old economy,” Goldman Sachs’ commodities said.
  • Jeff Currie pointed to prior underinvestment in vitality and industrials, which has led to offer factors that are fueling points now.
  • “All of the earnings coming out confirm this idea: the revenge of the old economy. Tech: missing substantially.”

The freefall in tech and other growth stocks shows that Wall Street is grappling with the “revenge of the old economy,” primarily based on Goldman Sachs commodities chief Jeff Currie.

That comes amid an earnings season that has seen the likes of Tesla, Microsoft, Alphabet and Meta report weak quarterly outcomes or provide disappointing guidance. In distinction, vitality and industrial companies have largely reported upbeat numbers.

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“All of the earnings coming out confirm this idea: the revenge of the old economy. Tech: missing substantially. You look at the energy names: all surprising to the upside,” Currie said in an interview with CNBC on Thursday. 

He said poor returns on the old monetary system over the earlier decade had shifted capital to the tech and growth sectors, ensuing in underinvestment in vitality and industrials that has led to offer points at current.

Additionally, oil and other commodities are thought-about late-cycle belongings, which means the impression of Fed cost hikes can have a delayed have an effect on on the old monetary system in comparability with tech and growth stocks, Currie said. 

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The commodities bull has been saying a model new supercycle is underway and well-known that prior supercycles have lasted about 12 years. 

Given that oil supercycles in the Seventies and the early 2000s lasted that prolonged, he estimated the current supercycle for oil that started in 2020 may ultimate earlier 2030.

Read the distinctive article on Business Insider

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