A livestream caught the moment a massive ship crashed into Maryland’s Francis Scott Key Bridge and caused it to collapse

A livestream caught the moment a massive ship crashed into Maryland’s Francis Scott Key Bridge and caused it to collapse
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A YouTube livestream captured when a large ship rammed into a support beam of the Francis Scott Key Bridge on Tuesday.
A YouTube livestream captured when a large ship rammed into a support beam of the Francis Scott Key Bridge on Tuesday.

  • A large ship crashed into a bridge in Maryland early Tuesday morning, causing it to collapse.
  • A livestream captured the moment at 1:28 a.m. when the vessel struck what appeared to be a bridge support beam.
  • Per ship tracking data, the vessel is Singapore-flagged and is listed at 984 feet long.

A YouTube livestream captured when a large ship struck a bridge in Baltimore, Maryland, causing it to collapse in the water early Tuesday.

The vessel appears to approach a support beam of the Francis Scott Key Bridge, which serves the I-695, at around 1:24 a.m. local time, according to video from StreamTime Live. The stream of the shipping channel is funded by Bay Area Mechanical Services.

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Per the video, the ship’s lights turn off minutes before striking the bridge. As the vessel nears the bridge, the lights then turn back on.

The ship impacts the beam at around 1:28 a.m. local time, and the bridge collapses in less than 10 seconds, with debris falling on top of the ship.

When BI reviewed ship tracking data of the area at around 2.50 a.m. local time, a Singapore-flagged container ship, the Dali, was broadcasting its signal from beneath the bridge, surrounded by several Coast Guard-listed vessels.

The Dali’s owner is listed as Grace Ocean, a Singapore-based firm, and its manager is listed as Synergy Marine Group, which is also headquartered in Singapore.

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The ship is also listed as 300 meters long, or about 984 feet.

A Grace Ocean staff declined a request for comment from BI when reached on the phone. Synergy Marine Group did not respond to calls from BI.

The bridge has been closed off because of a “collapse due to a ship strike,” the Maryland Transportation Authority wrote in a statement on X on Tuesday morning.

The Baltimore Police Department told ABC News that it was “notified of a partial bridge collapse, with workers possibly in the water.”

Representatives for the Maryland Transportation Authority did not immediately respond to a request for comment from Business Insider.

Read the original article on Business Insider

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